Ville de Genève

SITE OFFICIEL

Mise à jour: 20.03.2018
 

Monuments & Museums

Maison de Rousseau et de la Littérature

Maison de Rousseau et de la Littérature
© R. Gindroz

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born in the house that stood at number 40 of the Grand-Rue on 28 June 1712. This symbolic building is now devoted to contemporary literature and celebrates the work of this humanist philosopher, writer and musician of the Age of Enlightenment.

Grand-Rue 40
1204 Genève
Tel. 022 310 10 28
E-mail: info(at)m-r-l.ch
Website: m-r-l.ch
Open Tuesday to Sunday 11.00 – 17.30

Zoubov Foundation Museum

Zoubov Foundation Museum
© R.Gindroz

This aristocratic three-storey residence, known as the “Hôtel de Sellon”, is an excellent opportunity to get an inside and closer look at a luxurious 18th century building. Classed as a historical monument in 1923, this mansion is now used, in line with the wishes of the Countess Zoubov, for official receptions by the Genevan government and houses a museum that displays the elegance of an 18th town house.

Rue des Granges 2
1204 Genève
Tel. 022 312 16 97
E-mail: fondation.zoubov(at)etat.ge.ch
Website: ge.ch/zoubov/welcome.asp
Guided tours on Thursday, at 14h45 and 15h45

(The Zoubov Foundation Museum is currently closed for renovations, it will reopen on 28 February 2018)

Barbier-Mueller Museum

Barbier-Mueller Museum
© R.Gindroz

The Barbier-Mueller Museum's private collection of indigenous and tribal art, was begun in 1907 by Josef Mueller and continued by his son-in-law Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller. It is the largest private collection of ethnographic art in the world. It contains almost 7000 artworks, sculptures, masks, textiles, prestige objects and body ornaments from Africa, Oceania, the Americas (pre- and post-Colombian), tribal Asia and Maritime Southeast Asia, as well as pieces that date from the ancient periods of the great civilisations of Antiquity.

Rue Jean-Calvin 10
1204 Genève
Tel. 022 312 02 70
E-mail musee(at)barbier-mueller.ch
Website: barbier-mueller.ch
Open daily 11am – 5pm

Archaeological Site of the Cathedral

Archaeological Site of the Cathedral
© R.Gindroz

This internationally renowned archaeological site is one of the most extensive in Europe. In 1976, large-scale excavations were launched underneath Saint-Pierre Cathedral and its vicinity. They lasted for almost 30 years and brought to light the remains of churches that predated today’s cathedral, as well as traces of pre-Christian occupation.

Cour de Saint-Pierre 6
1204 Genève
Tel. 022 310 29 29
E-mail: clefs.stpierre(at)bluewin.ch
Website: site-archeologique.ch
Open daily 10.00 – 17.00

Collège Calvin

Collège Calvin - S4
© R. Gindroz

Along the medieval fortifications, Geneva built its first major public institution after the Reformation: the Collège de Genève. Founded in 1559 by John Calvin, it became a listed building in 1921. The Geneva Academy, headed by Theodore Beza, included an elementary and a secondary school and the University of Geneva. It offered instruction in literature, biblical languages, law and theology based on Calvin’s Catechism. The college was free and open to young men from all backgrounds. In the 16th century, it had 1200 students out of a population of 13,000. Sciences were added to the curriculum in the 17th century and modern foreign languages in the 19th century. The Collège de Genève was renamed Collège Calvin in 1969, when co-education was introduced in public schools.

Rue Théodore De-Bèze 2-4
1204 Genève

The Old Arsenal

Canons de la Vielle-Ville - S4
© M. Levet

Well-known for its old cannons intended to defend the Republic of Geneva against the covetous Duchy of Savoy and France, the Old Arsenal was originally an open-air market and became a covered market hall in the early 15th century. In the 1630s, a large granary was added above the hall, and a century later weapons replaced the bales of wheat. In 1877, this arsenal was moved to the Plainpalais barracks and the building fell into disuse. It was briefly a "Historical Museum" where old weapons were exhibited, until these were transferred in 1910 to the brand new Museum of Art and History. In 1923, it became a depository for the State Archives and now houses this institution. Its changing functions have not however modified its external appearance, which retains the characteristic architecture of a covered market topped with a granary.

Under the cornice, a frieze dating from 1972 reproduces a painting of 1893 destroyed by fire, wich illustrates important events in Geneva’s history. The mosaics covering the inner wall of the covered area date from 1949 and are the work of Alexandre Cingria. Originally intended to decorate one of the walls of the Hôtel de Ville, they depict the arrival of Julius Caesar in Geneva in 58 BC, the medieval fairs of Geneva and the arrival of Protestant refugees after the Reformation.

Rue de l'Hôtel-de-Ville 1
1204 Genève

A télécharger

Partage

Partager cette page

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+

Cultural trails

Exhibitions

Agenda juillet - décembre 2017

Publics


———————————

Logo Chéquier culture

Suggestions
La Ville est sur facebook

Découvrir d'autres pages du même chapitre :